Impermanence

Peter Silberman - Impermanence
Critic Score
Based on 15 reviews
2017 Ratings: #208 / 719
User Score
Based on 75 ratings
2017 Ratings: #225
February 24, 2017 / Release Date
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CRITIC REVIEWS

85
The 405

For those seeking the bloodletting catharsis of The Antlers, Impermanence may not be for you. But if you are looking for skillful song craft the likes of which we haven’t experienced in recent memory, give Peter Silberman your hand. He’s got a hell of a journey for you.

80
The Line of Best Fit

In many ways, Impermanence is vintage Silberman, a sullen continuation of his preoccupations with the maudlin and the melancholy. And irrefutable proof that silence is indeed golden.

80
musicOMH

Impermanence might have started out as a personal project, and it is an economical record consisting of six minimalist tracks, but self and city both run through it, giving a great sense of scale and scope.

80
Loud and Quiet
It’s an album that succeeds in balancing simplicity and elegance on every track.
80
Paste

In fact, it’s essential. Emphasizing silence as much as sound on Impermanence is Silberman’s way of saying that without the former, the latter is just noise.

80
Exclaim!

He possesses both the imagination and the vulnerability to make Impermanence work and — more importantly — to make it matter.

80
God Is in the TV

Impermanence is a brilliant extension of Silberman’s vulnerable and sincere nature as an artist and it should only ever be experienced in complete silence.

80
Drowned in Sound

Anybody looking for a return either to the thick atmospherics of Burst Apart or the more straightforward pop sensibilities of Hospice is going to be let down, particularly if they aren’t aware of the medical circumstances that were always going to rule that out from the off. For everybody else, Silberman has crafted an enthralling, minimalist mood piece on which the barely-there nature of the instrumentation belies deep nuance and forethought, with tension and insecurity rumbling softly beneath the face-value serenity. Gorgeous.

80
Under The Radar

This is one of those potentially life-changing albums, with a depth traveling the prism from the physical to the mental to the emotional to the spiritual, but with no heavy hand, just a ton of thought, and a lot of loaded space and not knowing.

80
The Guardian

His multi-octave voice is as intense as Jeff Buckley’s or Anohni’s, but it’s vulnerable without being precious or cloying.

70
Clash

Silberman uses the intimacy he’s fostered throughout his songwriting career to take colossally high-concepts and make them feel personable and part of a longer conversation between listener and artist.

70
PopMatters

The heights it reaches may not be as dizzying as those on that run of almost perfect Antlers full lengths, but Impermanence works wonderfully as a peaceful protest among louder glitchier new releases.

70
AllMusic

From the serene liquidity of "Karuna" to the spatial experimentations of the instrumental title track, Silberman's personal transformations are revealed on this thoughtful and understated debut.

69
Pitchfork

It’s a spare album that asks for a lot of patience, if only a fraction of what Silberman needed to rehabilitate his ears in isolation.

64
Sputnikmusic

This is a transitory album true to its name and its concept, illustrating a challenging but ultimately temporary chapter in Silberman’s life.

EMR
79
The Antlers lyricist and frontman Peter Silberman takes his first steps into solo territory with the awe-inspiring Impermanence, an album that is both harrowingly silent and yet astoundingly poignant with its smart use of silence as part of its foundations. After a traumatic experience of losing part of his hearing due to rare health conditions, the singer/songwriter has found himself a way around these tough obstacles, choosing to follow a different path within his passion and never willing to ... read more
85
A beautiful journey in ambiance and minimalism. Peter Silberman's bare but perfect arrangements are the perfect late night or rainy day album for you to get lost. His guitar playing is simple but just the right amount to carry the songs forward. His incredible falsetto voice immediately grabs you and is captivating throughout the whole album. The bare arrangements allow you to notice each piece of the music and its little intricacies. In a world of too much and lack of subtley, this album is a ... read more
Sappy
85
Top Favorite: Ahimsa
Other Favorites: Karuna, New York, Gone Beyond
Least Favorite: Impermanence
82
Really liked this album. I came into this not knowing any of the Antlers' discography (though I need to check them out now), and expected this to sound like pleasant background music. Instead, slow as it is, the sparse, minimalistic arrangements had me hanging on to every word. One of the most quietly intense and beautiful albums of this year so far.
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END OF YEAR LISTS

#48/Earbuddy

Track List

  1. Karuna
  2. New York
  3. Gone Beyond
  4. Maya
  5. Ahimsa
  6. Impermanence
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Added on: December 1, 2016