The history of the albums

This list includes in chronological order the important and unavoidable albums. A list updated regularly

Grant Green - Idle Moments
90
A few delicate touches, a perfect mastery of the strings and its chords, a pure and melodious style approaching the fusion between traditional Bop styles and Rhythm and Blues, here is how to describe in a few words one of the best and underestimated Jazz guitarist: Grant Green. Today we're going to take a look through his greatest classic Idle Moments and see how Grant Green was often too forgotten, even though he is clearly one of the 10 best jazz guitarists of all time. Influenced by the legendary guitarists Djando Reinhardt, Charlie Christian, Wes Montgomery and saxophonist Charlie Parker, Grant Green was pretty much against the jazz avant-garde, preferring to rely on his traditions, which made him one of Blue Note's most productive jazzmen in the 1960s. Similar to Jim Hall or George Benson in the sense that he clearly distinguished himself from the best Jazz had to offer in that period, Grant Green is also a remarkable composer who has a discography with many lost gems. Going through his discography is a colorful journey that is highly recommended if you want to listen to pleasant jazz without ever losing its technical virtues..
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The Beach Boys - The Beach Boys Today!
92
3 years after their great debut, the Beach Boys deliver their first undeniable classic: The Beach Boys Today! It was a long and complicated road, but driven by the talent of leader and genius Brian Wilson, the Beach Boys first managed to resist the British Invasion, while on the other hand becoming even more creative and innovative. That's probably why we're going back to the period when the Californian group carved their history in marble, something that the previous singles might not have been enough to build such a significant notoriety. Surprisingly, I had never listened to The Beach Boys Today until I worked on this review. But when I listened to it I was amazed both by the impressive amount of excellent singles I already knew, including the legendary Help Me Rhonda, which I will discuss in more detail later, and also by the Beach Boys' lead over the Baroque Pop competition. Because in reality, The Beach Boys Today was not only a sequel to their previous reference All Summer Long, the album was able to amplify a general Pop Rock, while emphasizing their new direction of Baroque Pop, which will find its quintessence the following year with the wonderful Pet Sounds. We are far from the beginning of the teenagers, artistic level the group has metamorphosed and has dimensions of gaps, personal level the group knew how to keep their youthful ardor and their culture, while showing a little more maturity.. to continue..
John Coltrane - A Love Supreme
99
Yes, A Love Supreme is my favorite jazz album, as if Coltrane had already said it all in the title of his greatest masterpiece. John Coltrane had already offered us a huge amount of extraordinary albums so far, but just like Miles Davis' Kind of Blue and Charle Mingus' The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady, this last relic was missing to compete with them. That day took a while, but it finally arrived, as the ultimate salvation, the divine consecration. As for his companions, A Love Supreme is a concept album, recognized in particular for having officially introduced the Spiritual Jazz, which remains one of the major revolutions that Jazz has known. There is the before and after of A Love Supreme, so much so that the avant-garde jazzmen of the following years followed these foundations and structures for decades. On the other hand A Love Supreme also represents the quintessence of Jazz Avant-Garde, Post-Bop and one of the most beautiful Modal/Free Jazz marvels that Jazz has known. The Jazz Spiritual that John Coltrane built is based on the philosophical aspect of music and themes. It's more a way of doing and being than a musical style in reality because it generally draws on Avant-Garde Jazz foundations (even if Jazz Spiritual incorporates international, often oriental sounds). It is above all a state of mind, which ended up entering the jazz mores and habits especially at the end of the 60s and during the 70s. Fusing culture, meditation, spirituality, philosophy, religion and beliefs, John Coltrane proposed a whole new vision of art and music in general, expanding the realms of the possible and the impossible. A Love Supreme is a reflection that reproduces itself endlessly, which has the gift of bringing you a different vision depending on the mood or your own personal state..
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Bob Dylan - Bringing It All Back Home
96
Released in 1965, Bringing It All Back Home is one of the emblematic albums of his discography, and not for nothing. Not only is Bringing It All Back Home one of the intermediate albums between two significant periods of his career, the evolution between contemporary Folk and Folk Rock, but on top of that he manages to capture all the essence of Dylan as he had never transcribed it so well before. For good reason, Bringing It All Back Home is probably one of the most complex Dylan's albums to understand at first glance, because it is of an incredible richness and a masterful technicality. That is to say that if for example you compare it to The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan or even to the one after Highway 61 Revisited, there may be a debate on which one is the best, but in any case Bringing It All Back Home is clearly the one that deserves the most. For those who need a little flashback, at that time the Dylan walked on water. He was one of the most influential artists, if not the most influential artist in the world, even more so than the Beatles. It's so impressive, that Folk was vampirized in almost every way, for many musical genres/styles, so much so that it became as popular as ever and Dylan himself became a "pop star" in his own way.. to continue..
The Sonics - Here Are The Sonics!!!
90
If you're looking for the perfect retro antidote to get your day off to a great start, look no further than the Sonics. Considered one of the first punk bands by reputation like the Kinks, the 2 bands represent the vast majority of influences that later bands in the entire Punk/Garage Rock family would follow, to this day. It's not for nothing that Sonics is said to have influenced legendary bands like The Stooges, MC5, The Cramps, The Ramones, not to mention our more contemporary bands and artists. If you don't know the Sonics yet, I could describe them to you in this way. You all take the energy, the Rhythms and Blues musicality and the hysterical way Little Richard or Chuck Berry used to sing, and make it even dirtier, more distorted, until it gets so cavernous that it turns you into a raging beast. For the time, the Sonics were seen as madmen by some, adored by others, they would have deserved the nickname The Animals more than the band itself. The music of Sonics is brutal, aggressive while keeping a certain melodic rhythm, and voluntarily wild. Led by Gerry Roslie, a singer out of the ordinary, which required not to push his partners to give all that has, used cries (the famous "Wah-ooh) and delivering lively songs that we believe recorded with a microphone. Sonics is the symbol of a new youth, of an uncomplicated ardor that does good, and that ages the old idols of Rock n Roll..
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The Horace Silver Quintet - Song for My Father
91
However, despite the great number of innovations, the year 1965 begins with a Jazz classic signed by a great legend, a thirty year old named Horace Silver, with Song For My Father, a great album but not revolutionary. That didn't stop its from going down in history.To describe him in a few words, Horace Silver is a cult jazz composer and pianist who started his career in the early 50s. Horace Silver has always worked mainly in Hard Bop and Cool Jazz. Among his best early achievements are of course Finger Poppin' With the Horace Silver Quintet (1959), 6 Pieces of Silver (1957) and Blowin' the Blues Away (1959), yet despite his more traditional bop style and rather conservative style, Horace Silver continued to build his immense career with a handful of excellent albums in the 60s. Moreover the album we will study today remains to this day the most famous and most appreciated reference.If his role was more in the 60's to innovate, Horace Silver had so much genius, that he managed to offer us particularly wonderful albums and compositions based on things he mastered or on various themes..
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Herbie Hancock - Empyrean Isles
92
To put it simply, Herbie Hancock's career is so exceptional that it can easily be divided into several parts. That's also what it's all about when you're dealing with a great artist, it's the possibility of being able to explore many different periods without the artist being abandoned the summits. Herbie Hancock stands out over 3 periods in my opinion. The first is when he was still a "rookie", barely 20 years old, but already had a fabulous level. The second, which we will start to study through the Empyrean Isles album, which is located in the mid-60s when Herbie had reached his peak when he was sailing the seas of Post-Bop, Modal and Avant-Garde Jazz, notably with 2 sublime albums. And the last one for which he is the most recognized, that is to say his Spiritual Jazz, Jazz Fusion and Jazz Funk period in the 70s. What leads me to make a simple and logical reflection on the career of an artist, if you want to continue, you must know how to juggle between success/building references and always know how to evolve your career. It is necessary to have the talent to do it, for sure. There are for example 2 examples of emblematic Jazzmen who succeeded in creating their absolute legend building a stratospheric career, following almost all the evolutions, it's Miles Davis and John Coltrane (although the latter had less time...). Of course this success factor applies to all musical genres/styles of the world, but let's get back to the main subject..
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Mississippi Fred McDowell - Delta Blues
83
As the period of the Blues Revival began to fade, notably with the emergence of British and contemporary Folk artists who drew their influences from the treasures of the legendary Bluesmen, it was clear that the Blues was about to experience new adventures. Today we are going to talk about an important and pioneering figure of the Hill Country Blues, with Mr. Mississippi Fred McDowell. To first tell you a few words about this musical style, Hill Country Blues originated in northern Mississippi, appeared and defined in the 60s as a mix of Delta Blues, Country and West African sounds. From its less conventional and anesthetic form, Hill Country Blues exudes a certain purity through an energetic groove. Going unnoticed at first, because often too much reserved for something local and rural, from the far north of Mississippi, this musical style became something traditional, before it was an influence on some artists of the 90's/2000's when the Garage Rock Revival period appeared. Fred McDowell was obviously not the only local artist to define this new musical style, but he became the emblematic figure as early as 1964 based on the history and legacy he left behind..
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Jan Johansson - Jazz på svenska
85
Today's experience has everything to relax you. It has the immediate effect of transforming you into a marshmallow, dripping at the bottom of your chair. A bewitching piano, languid lullabies will come to deliver you from all the harmful things that lurk in your mind. It's like therapy without a psychologist, a shot of happiness without morphine or other psychotropic drugs. Yet it's just cool jazz without any revolution, a non-clinical jazz album that's easy to miss. This is what the Americans, the motherland of jazz, did when jazz was born. To find this treasure unburied by time, you have to cross the Atlantic towards Europe, approach the English Channel and get lost on the shores of the Baltic Sea, in Sweden. There you will discover the legacy that lies beneath the sweet piano melodies of a certain Jan Johansson. Unknown outside the Scandinavian countries, Jan Johansson is nevertheless a cultural and artistic legend of his country, which unfortunately died too soon at the age of 37 following a tragic car accident.. to continue..
The Kinks - Kinks
86
When we think of the 60s, we necessarily think of the Beatles, the Stones or the Who, yet we tend to quote the Kinks second only to the Kinks, which is actually a huge mistake. Although they didn't have the success of the others, The Kinks covered us with better things throughout the decade and afterwards as well, leaving behind them a colossal legacy. Their influence was so strong that it stands out more or less through today's pop rock music. I will even allow myself to insist, saying that despite their cult projects or songs, The Kinks remain one of the most underestimated bands to this day, or at least not valued enough. When they arrived in 1964 as reinforcements to the British Invasion for their first album, the young Kinks were able to create a unique style, both sloppy and distorted. Based on an explosive mix of Rock n roll, Mod, Proto Punk and Garage, the Kinks have given an old-fashioned look to the very first American garage pioneers (Dick Dale, The Wailer, The Kingsmen), allowing the Garage Rock/Proto Punk musical styles to take their final forms. There are many reasons why their success and notoriety is not as important as the other iconic bands, but we'll have the opportunity to come back to this in future episodes, because believe me, you won't have finished hearing the name The Kinks resound on your screens..
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The Ronettes - Presenting the Fabulous Ronettes Featuring Veronica
89
To our great pleasure, the year 1964 is marked by a "healthy opposition" in the Pop Summit between 2 Girl Group schools, Motown and Brill Building. You may have followed the episode 247 devoted to Motown, where we find great classics such as Where Did Our Love Go / Baby Love by The Supremes or Dancing In The Street by Martha and The Vandellas. Well today we will look at the other school through the unique album of The Ronettes, because indeed if Motown was in turmoil at that time, the Brill Building continued to deliver treasures like Walking in the Rain or Leader on The Pack / Remember of the group The Shangri-Las. Although there is a musical and cultural difference between the two schools, there are many similarities, a kind of Pop/rhythm and blues/Soul mix that led to the overall development of Pop music, which finally is not so far away from today. The history of Les Ronettes has lasted a very long time but they became with very few people one of the most popular bands of the 60s. With the help of Phil Spector, they redesigned the contours of pop music in order to make it even more grandiose, especially in front of sympathetic, modern and trendy icons, reflecting the new generation. A very important step in the evolution of music.. to continue..
The Animals - The Animals (US)
84
When we talk about The Animals, one of the pioneer bands of the British Invasion, we can say that their fame was mainly built by a handful of singles, including the legendary The House of the Rising Sun which remains a cover version at the base. In reality, what's important is their impact and the legacy they left behind, much more than the albums themselves. In fact, it's better to build a compilation if you want to discover or revisit them. Nevertheless, I think it's important to reserve a place for them in this series, because they made history. We will therefore focus on their first solo album based on the US version which remains, despite its flaws, a delight for blues and rock fans. To resituate the band, The Animals falls into the same category as the Rolling Stones or the Yardbirds, that is to say that it explores the blues and rhythms and blues of Afro-Americans in order to twist them and return it to the British flavor. Led by their emblematic leader Eric Burdon, The Aminals are part of a small community of English bands that have allowed others to emerge. Although they start from American influence, The Animals have shown originality, thanks to their small innovations and especially their sincerity, which have forged their reputation. It must be said that in any case, no matter what we can reproach them for, the beginnings of the pioneer groups of the British Invasion have managed to engrave history thanks to the differences in character and identity that they were able to establish.. to continue..
The Supremes - Where Did Our Love Go
87
Now it's time to take a look at one of the music industry's most important monuments and one of its most important representatives, Motown and its band The Supremes. When you study music history, Motown is such an inevitable step that it would be criminal not to talk about it. Beyond the masterful content that the label has offered (we can even talk about brand), Motown is surely the one that has represented the Afro-American community the most in the eyes of the world. I even think that Motown was at the same time one of the motors of the American industry, a considerable influence, while being socially and politically a representative of civil rights, freedom and equality, denouncing all forms of discrimination. As a reminder when it was founded by Berry Gordy Jr. under the original name of Tamla Records in 1959 in Detroit. There was already a form of fracture in the breasts of the music industry caused "by racial differences". That is to say that with a few exceptions in rock n' roll and R&B/soul where there was a more pronounced mix, the different categories of music were very sectarian, even at the breasts of the listeners. To summarize in a crude way, there were the pop charts for the white people, the R&B charts for the black people. Fortunately, the new generation of artists and the public began to be interested via the revival periods of traditional music to look at new horizons, which allowed music to gradually erase the silly boundaries that existed. On the other hand, unfortunately, the 1960s in the United States were marked by strong opposition from communities forcing them to engage in political struggles that led to an almost civil war. If strong personalities like Martin Luther King continued to fight for the rights that the Afro-American community deserved as much as others, Motown was also a strong support through music. To continue..
Eric Dolphy - Out to Lunch!
95
On June 29, 1964, music experienced one of its most painful and tragic losses: the death of a legend, Eric Dolphy. While on a European tour with Charles Mingus, Eric Dolphy collapsed on stage during a concert in a Berlin club caused by a diabetic coma. A contested tragedy that opposes several versions. According to sources close to the artist, the hospital to which he was transferred following his coma, had believed in an overdose, a stereotype of the black man and the jazzman of the time, treating him accordingly. A choice that probably caused the death of a man. In the end, this tragedy became a symbol of a discrimination and racism that is pervasive in the United States and still rages to this day. A disgrace for humanity, which never ceases to repeat the same mistakes. But I'm going astray. Behind him, Eric Dolphy was able to leave behind him a few priceless relics of inestimable value, which fed his legend. Far from thinking that the success of the first posthumous album that we will discover today is due only to his famous tragedy, on the contrary it is one of the last gifts that Dolphy gave us to fly away to paradise. Focus... to continue...
The Beach Boys - All Summer Long
83
Let's be honest, although they have been able to offer a handful of mythical singles since their beginnings, their 6th album All Summer Long is the symbol of 3 important things: first of all it is the first album of the Beach Boys has clearly been of a good level which will trigger the series of mythical albums that we know almost all. Secondly it is that the Beach Boys were clearly the only American pop rock band capable of opposing the emergence of the British Invasion. And finally the last thing, All Summer Long remains the album that announces the real starting point of a new musical style: the Sunshine Pop/Soft Pop. How did the band finally find the formula that took them to the next level? Here is what happened.. to continue..
The Beatles - A Hard Day's Night
94
If you have followed the previous episodes or if you know their beginnings, 1964 is once again a pivotal year for the Beatles and for all the British Isles. To give you a very brief summary of the context, let's talk numbers and talk little. If the singles of 1963 follow one another progressively at the 1st place in the UK charts, the first 2 albums follow the same path. Moreover With the Beatles will become the second album to exceed 1 million sales in England. The Beatlesmania was launched in their country, but if the Beatles had acquired their Fab Four status at home and in Europe, there was one last step to take: the invasion of the United States. And it wasn't an easy thing to do, so much so that the Beatles were actually the first to set it all in motion. It must be said that the American record industry did not want to market the four boys, like Capitol Records for example, although they quickly changed their mind in a few days, when an honorable American label Vee Jay decided to take the plunge with their alternative version: Introducing The Beatles. Just 10 days after this first American release, Capitol released an album in its turn, the first of 4 others, spaced over 4 months only. The emerging success in the United States was so crazy that Capitol could only change his mind. Yet the Beatles hadn't even set foot on Uncle Sam's land yet.. To continue..
Lee Morgan - The Sidewinder
90
If you are familiar with the HOTA series, you may have noticed that with a few exceptions (especially when they are legends) there are few jazzmen from the 50's who have had the right to several episodes in the last 2 decades. It's a rather rare thing which can be explained by the very important evolution of jazz in about 10 years and also by the fact that I'm rigorous in the choice of albums. Today we're going to study again a work by Lee Morgan, which follows The Cooker. Remember, trumpet player Lee Morgan was only 20 years old when his iconic The Cooker was released and he had very few years of experience behind him. A great album that seriously lacks recognition. So why another episode? Simply because Lee Morgan has not only always released albums of very good quality, but on top of that he has managed the great feat of creating an album that will beat everything he's done before. We are talking about The Sidewinder, released in 1964. Besides he was great at that time, showing all the progression he knew and accumulated experience, that he will do the same thing again 2 years later with Search for the New Land. So there's a chance that there's a 3 episode as well. If I insist in my introduction on several important points highlighting Lee Morgan, it's simply because he remains an exceptional jazzman who is rarely quoted whereas he has always been one of the best.. to continue..
Irma Thomas - Wish Someone Would Care
83
Another example of one of the most beautiful Soul voices of the sixties, a pride of the south, a queen of New Orleans, I name Irma Thomas. At the perfect junction between the rhythm and blues roots of New Orleans, an underground Southern Soul with a little pop fantasy, Irma Thomas has not made history as directly as some of her peers because she never achieved the commercial success she hoped and deserved, yet she has built her own legend through a handful of singles, rare jewels and little exposed to the general public. She was known to exude a warm, bluesy voice, sometimes melancholy, sometimes sensual. She is globally part of the "pantheons of the forgotten" like important and influential personalities such as Solomon Burke or Arthur Alexander, yet there is something to thrill you, intensely. We will therefore study her prolific debut through her first and unctuous album: Wish Someone Would Care.. to continue..
Yusef Lateef - Eastern Sounds
91
In spite of the fact that he is a motto of opinions and that he does not have a discography that makes the unaminity, Yusef Lateef is a great figure of jazz because of his musical openness and his atypical side. This composer and multi-instrumentalist is a jazzman of reference who often swam against the current of what he was doing, bringing new sounds by exploring the music of the Middle East and Asia, being one of the first world music artists even before this term existed. Today we will study with the help of his masterpiece Eastern Sounds how Yusef Lateef came up with a new concept, traveling through the East and giving birth to one of the precursor albums of Spiritual-Jazz a few years before its time, that is to say before John Coltrane and his A Love Supreme (1965) (and even Jazz-Fusion). It is also an opportunity to immerse oneself in an extraordinary work that is now engraved in the history of music, beyond Jazz.. to continue..
John Fahey - Death Chants, Breakdowns and Military Waltzes
90
It is impossible, even criminal, not to honour the legendary John Fahey at least once when you make some kind of list of the ideal discography. There are many very simple reasons for this, the first being that he was an outstanding songwriter, a genius, innovative and technical guiratist who was able to give a whole new face to acoustic music, but also because he was the father of American Primitivism, a style he almost created all by himself, inspiring thousands of artists afterwards. He has built an incredible career over almost 40 years, in the shadow of spotlights on popular artists through a series of multiple wonderful albums. Treasures, small ones as they are known, there are a phenomenal amount of extraordinary things that he gave us as a gift before he passed away in 2001. Here is today one of the first examples with volume 2: Death Chants, Breakdowns & Military Waltzes... to continue..
Grachan Moncur III - Evolution
90
As in the previous episode, here is a new example of a little known jazzmen/composer from the 60's, who nevertheless managed to bring a new energy to Post Bop: Grachan Moncur III. Although he is building a long career, most of his work is from the 60s and 70s. Moreover even if we gather all his works as a frontman and also as a Sideman, he is not known to have been very productive. However Grachan Moncur managed in the space of about 3 years (from 1963 to 1965) to leave his mark, not least thanks to his first 2 albums Evolution and Some Other Stuff and especially because he is known to have been one of the first to integrate the trombone in the Avant-Garde Jazz, Free Jazz and Post-bop, marking an important change.. to continue..
Booker Ervin - The Freedom Book
88
If you want to listen to or build up an ideal jazz discography without necessarily confining yourself to the classics and popular works, this episode is for you. Here is once again an album and a jazzman that only specialists and connoisseurs know, yet one that deserves your attention, because yes, Booker Ervin's 1964 album The Freedom Book is a real buried treasure. Let's take the shovels to dig it up. First of all, who is Booker Ervin? He is a very talented Hard Bop/Post-Bop tenor saxophonist and composer despite his lack of recognition. He worked from the end of the 50's and during the whole decade of the 60's before disappearing prematurely in 1970, at the age of 39 because of a kidney disease. If you know him by name, you may have known him without knowing it for his work as a sideman for the legendary Charles Mingus or his famous composition Mojo..
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The Rolling Stones - The Rolling Stones
81
At a time when the British Invasion was beginning to emerge, many very promising English bands were following in their own way the footsteps of the Beatles, symbol of a revival and a nascent counter-culture. The revolution is underway. Among the most emblematic pioneer bands are of course The Kinks, The Animals, The Who, The Yardbird and then of course The Rolling Stones. Of course each band has its own particularities, to our great delight, they all appear as references that have marked history. So what differentiated the Rolling Stones from the others ? First of all, it is necessary to perpetuate the stereotypes, which in the end prove to be right and justified, by putting them in direct comparison with the Beatles. Although they came a little later and took a while to achieve as much success as the Beatles (without ever really catching up with them), The Rolling Stones became the most popular band of the British Invasion generation to compete with the Liverpool natives. More ingrained in American music than ever before, more Rhythms and Blues, The Rolling Stones have a reputation as more bad boys rebelling against the difference of the "nice and nice" Beatles. An opposition that is still debated today. Finally if we had to compare the Stones to others, I would say that they were closer to bands like The Animals and The Yardbirds by their Blues Rock and British Rhythms and Blues sides, while The Kinks and The Who were distinguished by a Mod approach, plus Garage Rock. So now, how did the Rolling Stones build their legend ? Here's what happened at the beginning...
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Stan Getz & João Gilberto - Getz/Gilberto
94
Today we will therefore analyse and revisit the fabulous masterpiece Getz / Gilberto, often cited as the best Bossa Nova and Samba-Jazz album of all time, and for the moment I find that this status is clearly deserved. In 1964, Bossa Nova had existed unofficially for just 10 years in the form we know it today, but it took a decade for it to reach its apogee thanks to the meeting of 3 geniuses of the genre: jazzman Stan Getz and the pioneers of Bossa Nova: João Gilberto and Antonio Carlos Jobim (because yes, although only the first 2 are cited in the title of the album, Jobim's contribution is almost identical, so it is logical to give him credit for this immense success as well). Was the legendary cast finally predestined to create something so wonderful? It is highly probable, but it is also a story of alchemy, a chemical reaction that pushed back the limits of Bossa Nova and Samba Jazz that had already offered so much. Above all, I would say that the result of this success can be explained above all by genius, as if it were destiny that it should happen. That's what we're going to see from now on..
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Shirley Collins & Davy Graham - Folk Roots, New Routes
84
Although it is more pronounced in the United States, the folk revival period of course extends internationally and specifically in England. This is not a surprise because the English have always offered a rich and seductive folk, which clearly stands out from the others. As I was able to quote in previous episodes on the subject, the Folk Revival period is not only the highlighting of the past, recalling the folk works of yesteryear, it is also a turning point for young artists who propose new directions. Here too, the English followed the same principle. This is why in 1964, the country discovered the magical meeting between Shirley Collins and Davy Graham (or Davey), two influential actors of this period who knew how to propose a beautiful album which, despite its little recognition, remains a particularly important piece for English folk music. And for good reason, Folk Roots, New Routes is one of the most remarkable works of their respective discography, even the best even if it is debatable. If it is not the most innovative on the contrary, it is surely one of the most successful because the alchemy that occurs between the two artists is simply sumptuous. Here is its story..
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Andrew Hill - Black Fire
89
History has shown us that in art there will always exist misunderstood geniuses whether it is in the course of an artist s career or even forever. Obviously the first example that comes to mind is the legendary Leonardo da Vinci who finally got recognized after his death or for example the Zombies with their famous classic Odessey and Oracle which took decades to be adored even though the group had died out in 1968 due to lack of popularity. In jazz there are also several examples, including Andrew Hill who we will analyze today, a great composer and pianist avant-garde jazz and Post-Bop who in the mid-60s was able to offer works ahead of his time, recognized only in retrospect. It's a dawn for us listeners and music lovers to be able to come back and study works that had not really made any noise when it came out. It's a chance to be able to retrace stories like his, especially since it has left indelible traces, although it has never reached the rank of jazz legends...
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Nara Leão - Nara
85
Although I have already mentioned the term MBP (Música Popular Brasileira) in previous episodes of HOTA when I talked about João Gilberto, Antônio Carlos Jobim or Jorge Ben, famous pioneers of Brazilian music, this term, which was unofficial until then, only became official in 1964. Globally, MBP is still a rather broad designation that actually combines 2 key factors: traditional Brazilian styles modernized, combined with international trends, for a so-called popularity rendering. That is to say, in fact, there are no really primordial rules, we can all simply say that these are songs that can appeal to the general public and the media. Generally the MBP re-exploits historical traditional styles such as Bossa nova and all the drifts of Samba, while sticking to the global trends that will follow such as sweet pop, rhythm and blues at first, followed by folk, rock and then psychedelia at the end of the 60s. Finally, there is a strong correlation between the emergence of MBP and the modernization of music with what we see all over the world at that time, such as the phenomenon of the British Invasion or the Yé Yé in France, which concretely resembled a major social-cultural change, which we owe to the new generation of baby boomers. The vision and methods remain very similar..
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Bob Dylan - The Times They Are a-Changin'
87
In 1964, Bob Dylan was quietly propelling contemporary folk/singer-songwriter into a whole new dimension all by himself, yet it is crazy to think that he was not far from doing even better. It was just the beginning. While the general public was only just beginning to get to know him, through a few hits, a few covers of other artists and through his militant involvement, Bob Dylan was only 23 years old at the time, yet he was endowed with a maturity and a writing that was already divine. That year, Dylan offered us 2 albums, the first one The Times They Are a-Changin' that we studied today, released in January and a second One Side of Bob Dylan released in August. I have to say that I hesitated a lot in the choice of the one that I will analyze in more detail because in reality these 2 albums complement each other and are rather equal. As you will have understood I chose The Times They Are a-Changin' by simple preference and also because it is more accomplished than the second one..
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Muddy Waters - Folk Singer
89
A universal rule says that in music everything is connected, because in the end inspiration and culture follow an implacable logic, one way or another. The album we are going to analyze today may not seem to have a direct link with everything that happened in 1964 or in the previous years, but in reality there is much more correlation than we think. First of all, we can simply say that the legendary Muddy Waters made such an impression that we can understand the impact he had on all the English bands of that time, on American Soul and R&B and finally on folk music. In 1964, Muddy Waters offered us again an extraordinary album that we are not ready to forget when we listen to it, that we can classify very clearly in his most important works. To put all this in context, we have to go back 4 years earlier when Muddy Waters had delivered one of the most mythical lives in the history of music at Newport. His influence was already so strong at that time, making us discover for the new generation the essence of blues and the origin of the electric guitar, especially the Rolling Stones and the Animals to name a few. At that very moment Waters was masterful, which earned him a nomination for the Grammy Awards. However, Waters finally had to face the other side of the coin when his influence became so strong that the new artists who were inspired by him ended up getting more commercial exposure. In the early 60's, the Blues Revival was quickly overshadowed by the Folk Revival which failed to deliver what the Blues scene deserved. Fortunately, the Blues has always been able to act discreetly to make a difference..
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Sandy Bull - Fantasias for Guitar and Banjo
86
It's hard to contradict me if I tell you that a few banjo or guitar notes can take you on a journey. You know, we've all been at least once under the spell of notes intertwining and plunging you into an intense bath of emotions, totally crossing your body and mind. You feel this breath delicately caressing your skin, all these shivers that come to animate you. You are not there physically, but the sensations are so perceptible that even by smell you feel something. It is then that multitudes of images invade you, everything becomes as real. You are there. That's exactly the feeling I get when I listen to Blend, one of the instrumental wonders of American Primitivism composed and performed by Sandy Bull, accompanied by jazzmen and percussionist Billy Higgins. I then imagine myself in an American landscape, like in the far-western era. Lost in the countryside, between desert valleys, sand and pebbles of all kinds. With the sun beating down, I travel miles and miles riding a brave horse in search of animal prey to feed me. As the night shows the tip of its nose, exhausted from not having found anything, the scavengers begin to take position. However, I am fortunate enough to meet the natives, who despite their mistrust invite me to join them. After a good feast around a fire, the daily ritual begins, between dance and oath, the old wise man of the village gets a handmade stringed instrument resembling a banjo. From his hands he makes a bewitching music spurt out. It is then that the mix of exotic products and all kinds of magical weed that I consumed just before, allied to his melodies propels me to the 7th heaven. It was splendid. I wish you could have been there..
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The Beatles - With The Beatles
88
October 1963, one might think that the time of revolution had come. Thousands of people, mostly young people. Delirious crowds gathered in the same place, piling up until they could no longer move. Hysterical women who expected only one thing: to be able to see their idols for real. On the other hand, the police were distraught, cornered. Each officer struggled, even risking their lives, to contain the delirious crowd. You could see their distress and stress on their faces. You could even see that little drop of sweat running down their faces, from their forehead to their cheeks. It was even necessary to use great means, even violence. There were those who made sure that the world didn't fall apart, and the others who were in charge of protecting those who were at the origin of all this, the artists. The Beatles. The police had the delicate and risky job of escorting them to the stage, while the delirious crowd could eat them alive. Even if the mission was always accomplished, nothing was ever finished. Once on stage, the screaming and yelling was even louder. It was the apotheosis. They had to be contained so that no one could climb over the wall. They thought they were giving their lives. They thought they were giving their lives. No one had ever seen anything like it..
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Mongo Santamaria - Watermelon Man
78
In 1963 New York is struck by an addictive and particularly jazzy phenomenon called Boogalu. Far from being an ephemeral trend, Boogalu imposed itself during the decade of the 60s until it became a part of traditional culture. As a multi-cultural basin, New York saw its Latin American and African-American communities waddle on the dance floor to the frantic rhythms of Salsa, until the end of the night. When the Boogalu arrived, not only were people discovering a new musical style, but also new dances were born, much to the delight of partygoers. It all started when a Latin/Cuban music legend known as Mongo Santamaria decided to merge traditional Cuban styles including Mambo and Salsa with American Jazz and R&B, on his now cult song: Watermelon Man. Then it was not the only one, one thinks in particular of Willie Bobo and Ray Barretto, but Mongo Santamaria shows again that he marks the history of the music..
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Phil Spector - A Christmas Gift for You
87
It's not Christmas, but I assure you that the magic will be there when you listen to this great compilation! Today we're going to analyze and revisit a famous compilation of labels, a format that I've never heard of in HOTA. It's a particularly successful project that highlights one of the most trendy trends of 1963: the Girl Groups. And that's great, because we've just received several gifts from Phil Spector of the Philles Records label, so let's open them all in chorus. Let's start first of all to unwrap the context, Girl groups is not a style which was just born, in fact it started to develop in the 50s, very often with bands very influenced by Doo-Wop. One thinks in particular of the group The Chordettes with their single Mr. Sandman (1954) or The Chantels with Maybe (1957). However in reality, after a period of mutation, the girls groups finally exploded during the year 1963, supporting afterwards some years of dominations in the image of Pop Rock and Soul. This is explained by the considerable improvement in the content and performances of its bands. In fact, it's all related to the evolution and innovations we know about the Brill Building, which is more a kind of "school/structure" rather than a musical style as such (even if sounds are now associated with this term) that has its origins in a community created in a building in New York City where several artists/composers/producers got together to develop other artists. The different evolutions of the 2 aspects allowed to create this dreaded pop/rnb fusion..
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Joe Henderson - Page One
84
History has taught us that we recognize above all the difference between the great jazzmen and those who will remain honourable outsiders in their atypical and singular way of playing. Of course, we know that those who have become "great" have almost all excelled once with one of their work as a leader, but there are exceptions that have shown that it was also possible to make history as a sideman, like Scott LaFlare or Wynton Kelly for example. It may seem logical, but the opportunity to do a job as a leader often allows you to establish and define your own game that the sideman will follow and accompany, without really pretending to overshadow the leader. If I wanted to clarify all this, it's because today we are going to analyze the first album and the beginning of the career of Joe Henderson, one of the best saxophonist tenor in the history of jazz. In addition to being very gifted, innovative and very technical, Joe Henderson built his reputation thanks to his powerful, percussive and particularly unbridled playing. It's so striking that it's easy to recognize his unique playing once you get to know him..
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Dave Van Ronk - Folksinger
85
Have you ever dreamed of being able to play with time? Not necessarily to make a difference, like ending wars or getting rich by inventing a vaccine. Rather, imagine that it would be for the purpose of being able to revisit moments you never had the chance to do. Personally, I've always dreamed of owning the Doc Brown DeLorean or time captures that allow me to travel through time. Here, for example, we're going to analyze a fascinating artist we call Dave Van Ronk, an emblematic figure of Contemporary Folk from the late 50s and 60s, so what better way to travel than to be able to take a trip back to where it all began: like Greenwich Village for example? Fortunately, music has the power to transport us and make our imagination speak. But between dreams and myths, it is often reality that writes history and therefore those that remain engraved forever. So let's put things back in place: we are in the early 60's, in New York City, 14th street on Manhattan, at the place of the source, the famous Greenwich Village neighborhood..
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Sam Cooke - Night Beat
87
Los Angeles, Hacienda Motel, on the night of December 11, 1964, the police found the body of Sam Cooke, victim of a murder in a sordid story, which moreover never found answers. Since I'm only going into the purely musical aspect, I'll say that the world lost at that time one of the pioneers of Soul and one of the most popular artists of the time. A real media tremor that shook the country and the whole world. And for good reason, Sam Cooke was a star. Although questionable and imperfect, he greatly contributed to the democratization of Soul among a large audience. A very important fact that changed the course of music history. We will therefore analyze today the best record he achieved in his lifetime, Night Beat released in 1963, which remains to this day his penultimate studio album..
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John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman - John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman
83
Today I want you to be particularly relaxed, that nothing could spoil this moment. I want you to sit in this chair. Don't hesitate to slouch down, until you're stuck. Lovers of gluttony, let yourself go. We have Cuban cigars and a good bottle of 30-year-old whiskey. It's good, are you relaxed? Perfectly. In this case, you are ready to discover or rediscover, for those who have already had the chance, a true jazz vocal classic from the 60s. And it's not just anyone, the poster is enticing, it excites you like a flea. Ladies and Gentlemen, I have the pleasure of analyzing with you the album John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman, released in 1963 by Impulse!..
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Charles Mingus - The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady
98
Have you ever imagined what paradise looks like, or at least the place that could be called ideal? To be honest I've asked myself this question hundreds of times, always making up different scenarios. And then one fine day, at the dawn of autumn, by dint of scratching my head to think, which by the way accelerated my baldness, I found the answer. What if The Black Saint and The Sinner Lady were the set, and the orchestra led by Charles Mingus were the actors. There will be no jazz lover who will contradict me, so if you've never visited paradise, it's high time you thought about it. We are in July 1963 when a jazz record, as it comes out every week, appears in the bins of the stores. However, this is not like the other times, it was actually an unusual day. So yes, it was already not so insignificant because the reputation and fame of the name Mingus was making ink and saliva rain down on the listeners, but it is important to point out that despite his legend, Mingus was not the popular star of the jazz sphere either. It is with time that we all definitively understood that he was one of the monuments unlike Davis or Coltrane who had already acquired their reputations at that time. So nothing was written in advance..
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Prince Buster - I Feel the Spirit
82
Today we are going to take our zeppellin for a trip to Jamaica, a small country in the Caribbean known mainly for scuba diving, athletes or reggea, however in reality we still retain its stupid but funny stereotypes, that is to say Bob Marley and the flavored smoke. Of course, in reality it's not only that. Being a very important land of music, it's just interesting when you analyze the course of history, to understand the cultural impact Jamaica may have had. If we go back to the late 70's, in England, punk was dominant but the country is shaken by the considerable influence of reggea, so much so that punk bands such as the Clashs or Police have incorporated sounds/structures in their music. This is mainly explained by Jamaican immigration and social movements at that time in England. It was so popular that English artists/groups that had no connection to Jamaica, such as Madness and The Specials, launched a wave that is called 2 Tone and/or Ska, simply illustrating the second wave of Ska..
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Solomon Burke - If You Need Me
83
It's no secret that the beginning of the 60's was marked by the strong domination of soul in the charts, becoming one of the main inspirations for the Pop-rock artists/groups of this decade. When we finally analyze the number of brilliant artists and the huge amount of cult singles from this period, we quickly understand why. In previous episodes, I have often cited Ray Charles, Clyde McPhatters, James Brown, Sam Cookes, Aretha Franklin and Etta James as the pioneers of soul. In reality, although this is totally the case, in the end they were the logical choices given their legacy and their great popularity. Yet there are several schools and opinions that oppose this, including those who think that true "Soul" only appeared in the 1960s. It's debatable, especially when you listen to Ray Charles' eponymous debut album for example. But there's one thing that almost everyone agrees on, and that is that "Soul" took its full form in the sixties, when the musical drifts and sub-styles appeared..
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Jackie McLean - Let Freedom Ring
85
Not being systematically cited as one of the best saxophonists in history (more specifically alto saxophone), Jackie McLean is nevertheless one of the most gifted saxophonists in the world, with a very impressive record, which should in my opinion deserve more praise. For that, let yourself be gently but surely carried away in some of his works, such as Let Freedom King, released in 1963, which remains one of his first albums that we would describe as a must. You then understand very quickly that he knows how to be very talented, at the same time when he delivers an intense play or on the contrary very extensive. In addition to being a very good musician, he also knows how to be a very good composer and a good conductor. Jackie Mclean is the epitome of longevity. He started as a prodigy in the early 50's when he was 20 years old, playing in Miles Davis' first bands, before becoming a major and influential player in hard bop. In the 60's he was still able to adapt and evolve, raising his level of playing and composing with the arrival of the Post-bop period and Modal structures, gradually moving towards the avant-garde Jazz. What I love about Jackie McLean is that although I prefer his "60's" period, it's quite possible according to the subjectivity of each one to prefer another period of his career, given the richness of his discography..
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Jorge Ben - Samba Esquema Novo
90
Among all the great stars of Brazilian popular music (MPB), it is impossible not to mention the name of Jorge Ben (now Jorge Ben Jor). The reasons are quite simple, Jorge Ben is clearly one of the most innovative and one of the best Samba music performers/composers of all time. We will be studying several albums from his discography in this series. Best known notably for his more experimental prowess in the late 60's and throughout the 70's, Jorge Ben emerged in 1963 giving a second wind to Samba. Can we say that he was indispensable? We will dig to understand the importance he may have had at the beginning of his career. To put it in context, Samba is a bit like soccer for Brazilians, it's part of an inescapable culture rooted in tradition. Samba represents so many things for his country. Appeared at the beginning of the 17th century, from African roots and all the period of slavery, began to develop in the western part of Brazil through dances. It was not until the beginning of the 20th century that the musical aspect was more recognized and put on the same level as the dance..
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Kenny Burrell - Midnight Blue
90
Although he was never as innovative as Wes Montgomery, Jim Hall or his main influences Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt, Kenny Burrell remains one of the most atypical and brilliant jazz guitarists with a phenomenal track record. Beginning his career in the early 50's, Kenny Burrell has not only influenced Jazz artists, he has also been an example, marking the minds of Blues, R&B and Rock guitarists. While he made his weapons during the swing and bop period, Kenny Burrell generally turned to hard bop throughout his career, while always being very close to Soul Jazz and then Smooth Jazz, because his playing is characterized by soulful and bluesy touches. Sideman deluxe and adored by his peers, Kenny Burrell is known for his collaboration with Jimmy Smith or on the album The Cats, but he was also a truly enduring leader of merit with more than 70 albums to his credit..
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Bob Dylan - The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan
94
If The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan is still as breathtaking today as it was then, just imagine for a few seconds the momumental slap that the listeners of that time took when he came out. It's like the effect of a veritable seismic event, forever changing the landscape of music. When you think about it, it was hard to predict, if not impossible. Dylan had just released a seductive debut album, which could suit both the more traditional as well as the new generation of young folk artists, synonymous with renewal. Commercially, the album was only intended to reach a targeted audience, during which the folk revival was still pale in comparison to traditional music. A rather voluntary choice, supported by the fact that it did not promote any single and its status as a beginner. Generally speaking, Dylan continued to make his way, gradually making his mark on the folk scene. A first album that also allowed him to make a name for himself. Without having the ambition to become very famous and without knowing it yet, Dylan will be one of the main responsible of "the reunification of the worlds" between traditional and popular music. It was still too early to say, however, The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan is the starting point...
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The Dillards - Back Porch Bluegrass
81
Appearing in the 1940s in the Appalachia region, bluegrass is a mixture of traditional folk music, with elements of Blues, Jazz and of course Country which remains the genre in which it is classified according to opinions. This musical style stands out for its very intense tempo, its often impressive technique and the traditional instruments used. It is better known in the only instrumental forms, than accompanied by singing, because it mainly emphasizes the performance, improvisation and sound of the instruments (banjo, fiddle, mandolin, violin, dobro, harmonica, acoustic guitar etc...), however the way of singing, especially "talking" or "close harmony", had an almost equal importance on the immense influence that the Bluegrass had. Besides the playing techniques and the way of singing, Bluegrass has left a very important, though often underestimated or neglected, imprint on contemporary folk and country music. Developed by the pioneers Bill Monroe, Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs or The Staples Brothers, it is a mistake on my part not to have analyzed one of their works. So I'm going to take advantage today that it's the turn of The Dillards to pay tribute to bluegrass..
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James Brown - Live at the Apollo
93
October 24, 1962, a packed theater, fans bubbling with impatience on bright red seats in the dark, the tension is at its height. We are almost there. The famous Apollo Hall, which had known many stars until then, will go to know his first live recording with a popular Soul star of the moment, who was still far at the time to have acquired this legendary status, a man named James Brown. Accompanied by his famous band Flames, Brown was preparing against all odds to offer one of the most cult lives of all time, curtains up..
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The Beatles - Please Please Me
92
For many, the beginning of the Beatles' career was a group from Liverpool that became known in The Cavern Club and overnight became the most popular band in the country and then the world. Very often, the Beatles' debut is subject to criticism, sometimes justified, blaming them for being too popular, too simplistic, or even overrated. However, despite the flaws and small mistakes of the beginning, if the Beatles have become the symbol of pop music, it is far from being a coincidence. It is the fusion of extraordinary alchemy and absolute genius. When the Beatles performed on October 12, 1962 at the Cavern Club, where they were the stars of the place at the time, even inviting one of their idols Little Richard, they had just celebrated their 17th place in the UK charts for their first single Love Me Do. They were certainly not aware of the magnitude that the band would take months later. For the first time since they decided to make music their potential career, the band was finally beginning to have a real hope of making this dream come true. Yet before the spotlights and the cries of desperately obsessed fans, illustrating the Beatlesmania, it is important to take into account that they came back from far away, going through periods full of pitfalls, where many times they thought about giving up..
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Thelonious Monk - Monk's Dream
90
It's time to prepare to say goodbye to the year 1962. What better occasion to revisit a memorable album, which has left its mark through its charisma and its cast of legends: I'm talking of course about Money Jungle. This album is like ringing the end of recess, and it's time to sit down and listen to the wise man who comes to teach you a lesson in life. There is strictly everything from Money Jungle that deserves your attention. First of all, you have to be aware of the phenomenal cast, a trio composed of Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and Max Roach, each of them can easily be considered as at least in the top 3 of the best musicians of their respective instruments. Jazz is known for its mythical duo collaborations, where then a dream team to support a legendary leader, but here we enter another universe, which is beyond us complement. Personally I can't help thinking about the term "Supergroup" created in the 60/70s to define a group of big stars, mainly in pop/rock, and it's technically acceptable to think that Money Jungle is played by a jazz supergroup..
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Duke Ellington / Charlie Mingus / Max Roach - Money Jungle
88
It's time to prepare to say goodbye to the year 1962. What better occasion to revisit a memorable album, which has left its mark through its charisma and its cast of legends: I'm talking of course about Money Jungle. This album is like ringing the end of recess, and it's time to sit down and listen to the wise man who comes to teach you a lesson in life. There is strictly everything from Money Jungle that deserves your attention. First of all, you have to be aware of the phenomenal cast, a trio composed of Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and Max Roach, each of them can easily be considered as at least in the top 3 of the best musicians of their respective instruments. Jazz is known for its mythical duo collaborations, where then a dream team to support a legendary leader, but here we enter another universe, which is beyond us complement. Personally I can't help thinking about the term "Supergroup" created in the 60/70s to define a group of big stars, mainly in pop/rock, and it's technically acceptable to think that Money Jungle is played by a jazz supergroup..
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Roy Haynes Quartet - Out of the Afternoon
84
Have you ever been in admiration of an artist's immense career? Today's analysis doesn't tell the career of a very popular international star, nor of an absolute genius who has all revolutionised along the way, nor of an artist who has such a crazy story that it goes beyond music itself, no. Today I'm going to talk about an excellent album, illustrating a career, still in activity today, remarkable for its inexhaustible longevity and of course also for its talent. It's time to talk about Roy Haynes, one of the 10 best drummers in the history of Jazz, recognized first of all for having redesigned (and thus revolutionized) rhythmic techniques with cymbals and drums, and another one with the snare. With a career spanning more than 70 years, Roy Haynes has shown an extraordinary flexibility and adaptation, first exploring all forms of bop before moving on to the avant-garde, modal, jazz fusion and finally Neo-bop. We might as well tell you that the term "impressive" is not enough..
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Comments
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2w
Thank you @Scre4meh, its kind my friend! I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate you again on your latest reviews, especially the ones on Kanye!
2w
Best list on AOTY
2w
Thank you very much for this message @tiagoaon, it's very kind! If you don't have a lot of time, direct me to things you like and I'll make recommendations (:
2w
This list is amazing really, so bad for me to take so long to discorver it!
1mo
Thank you very much @elextranodpl!
1mo
Now this is dedication! Amazing list and concept for it. Can't say nothing but congratulations, might have to check some of these.
2mo
Merci Math 🙏 je n oublierai jamais que tu as été le premier à suivre cette série !
2mo
HOTA is iconic
2mo
Thank you so much for this comment and your support 🙏 I appreciate it, it's really touching! @Allofasudden
You're welcome, you know not only I read them but also I like your opinions/analyses, keep it up! Personally I think it's normal to give strength when it's deserved, and even if sometimes we don't agree (like on DS2, hehehe for the moment we really don't agree) but it's important to hear the comments and opinions of others (:
2mo
You're truly one of the most passionate & sincere guy I've
ever seen when it comes to music. You're devoting so much to this website & this list shows. Appreciate this great work & thanks for liking my reviews from the start. Idc if you’re reading them or not but I just wanted to tell. :)
4mo
I very much appreciate your compliment, thank you! I hope you can find out a lot of things! @MikeOwen
4mo
This is the best list on the website without a doubt. It's introducing me to a whole load of albums I wouldn't have checked out otherwise, and a good few of them here are really helping with wider listening for my music class. Thanks for compiling this!
4mo
Thank’s so much @Jameswg03
4mo
This is one incredible list!
4mo
Thanks @dearsongs, it's a pleasure! Can't wait to see your possible future reviews on this topic
4mo
This winter I’m def using this list to discovery lots of gems. Keep it up 👍🏻
4mo
Thank you it's very kind Ryan! @cipater22
4mo
What an amazing piece of work this is
5mo
Thank you very much! I'm happy to help! @TommyAOTY
5mo
Thank you so much for this. This project will definitely help me on my musical listening journey.
5mo
That's really kind, thank you very much! Appreciate it! @MusicGod
5mo
Wow this is amazing. This is easily the best list I’ve ever seen on this website. I’m looking forward to what you do with this in the future.
5mo
A huge thank you! I appreciate your support and encouragement! I am happy to see people like you take an interest in my work! @Felix_96
5mo
That's what you call a list. Looking forward to discover some great music here. Thanks DoubleZ for your passionate effort on creating this list.
5mo
Thanks @Docky! I'm happy to make you discover albums and artists!
5mo
Damn this thing is really cool, I have yet to finish reading even 1/4th of this but damn this is really well written and interesting. G'job on making this! I'll give some of these albums a listen later
5mo
Thank you very much my friend! @(N0stalgia) ! I plan to continue until today, even if it will take a long time! The advantage is that there are so many wonderful things to discover every year that sometimes you don't want it to go any further!
5mo
This project is easily my favourite on the whole website and I was wondering if you're only gonna do it for the early years in popular music or if you're planning to keep expending on it until one day you get to the 2020's?
7mo
Thank you @Musk, that's kind of you!
7mo
This is very cool and unique! Thank you for doing this project.
9mo
Thanks for the comment and for the support, Simo!
9mo
This is incredible. Thank you for making this
10mo
Thank you, I really appreciate it!
10mo
This may well be the single best list I've seen on this site. Keep up the great work!
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