Best of 2021

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83
Apr 18

Recent Ratings

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83
Apr 18

Pinned Review

Whynot -
95
EDIT - Finally

Ok, here are my thoughts (maybe feelings)

Dylan is one of those artists that has accomplished almost everything. He has an extensive discography (with at least six records filling every single list about the best rock albums of all time) a Nobel prize, an Oscar and a long list of personal records. In fact there is not a single one music lover over thirty years of age that is going to doubt his relevance as a musical figure. Otherwise, I have always had the feeling that for the ... read more

Recent Reviews

Whynot -
98
The "wild mercury sound"

There are not many double albums you can say are near to perfection, but Blonde On Blonde certainly is one of them. It is not only one of the first ever rock double album recorded (long discussion regarding that point by the way and the thing finally depends on what do you define as rock and if you believe on the release date usually cited but probably wrong) but is also the pinnacle and final album of Bob Dylan’s 60s electric trilogy.

It is ... read more
Whynot -
15
I have so many good memories with The Offspring music. Why are you doing this to us guys? It is even difficult to write something about this record without just trashing it, but this is so painfully mediocre.

They have never been an amazing pack of musicians but at some point of their career they definitely had tons of soul, and soul is precisely what I can't find in this album, everything is so artificial, the vocals (I mean, really, what happened with the vocals here? Is it the mix? Is ... read more
Whynot -
95
It all started as a vomit.

Going from folk to electric it was not easy for Bob. I certainly do not know how much he suffered with it, but for sure he was super tired. He changed not because it was the next thing to do, he changed because he needed to change. If you want to put it in simple words, he desperately ran away from the folk world (but not necessarily from its music) and from his own folk incarnation.

“Highway 61 Revisited” is the middle album from his 60s trilogy, the ... read more
Whynot -
82
Just a couple of thoughts about this one.

Generally I love punk rock records (I mean 90s punk rock, because nowadays punk-rock is more punk-pop than anything, which is ok, but it is certainly different) but I usually have problems with how these types of bands decide to age. The most terrible example is of course Green Day being a bunch of guys living their late 40s singing like they were teenagers which makes them totally hard to believe in. In that sense I like when the bands decide to age ... read more
Whynot -
93
Dylan sells his soul to the electric rock devil... half of it at least.

If during “Another Side Of Bob Dylan” Bob changed his lyrical interest to a more personal topic rather than socio political ones, in “Bringing It All Back Home” he changed his musical identity in a move that was as bold as controversial. Nothing would be the same again for him, maybe some things came back later in his catalog for sure but his identity as an artist changed forever.

One of the ... read more

Shoutbox

Mar 20, 2021
your my 100th follower! thanks for the follow
Mar 20, 2021
aw thanks :) i like your reviews too!
Mar 20, 2021
thanks for the follow!
Mar 12, 2021
Thanks for the follow! Glad to have found your page!
Mar 11, 2021
And he always denied both titles. He’s not a poet, he’s not a spokesman, but it’s enough to him if you say that he’s just guy who writes songs (“because I got nothing else to do, man”). But when he admits again that he’s in trouble since the beginning, since he put his suitcase on the ground, you realize it’s not quite a “normal” songwriting life; and just a little read about his life shows to what point the songwriting and the recording dictated the directions of his life, dragging him to the unknown, mostly absurd but true and vivid. He may not be the greatest innovator musically, the formal song structures are very simple again, nothing remarkable about form, but if The Beatles or Jimi Hendrix are some, then much thanks to him. He should have taken care of his voice as much as of what he was saying. His singing in “Time Out of Mind” was technically better, in my opinion. But in “Love and Theft” his voice wasn’t yet a tempestuous noise of thunder and lightning heard.
Mar 9, 2021
One more thing: I didn’t know Charley Patton. Bob said he didn’t read Ezra Pound to write “Desolation Row” — and Ezra had hard times involving himself with the fascism of Mussolini: took such a different path compared with that ‘63 young and marching Dylan (the parade of liberty) —, but he is, at least literally, a little similar to Ezra. He was some kind of cultural instrument, many times more praised as a reviver and cultural spokesman than as the virtuous, tormented poet he was, considered by T. S. Eliot and James Joyce the most important poet of the century and a major influence in their work. Our dear bother Bobby Dylan is praised in both ways (and sometimes mocked for both ways but never reasonably), that’s why he deserves a Nobel Prize like Eliot.
Mar 9, 2021
Thanks :)
Mar 9, 2021
Sorry if I can’t add much to what a lot of people must have said (and I didn’t read) about his 2001 album, which is not the one I listened to the most (just around four or five times). Bob knows how to overcome his influences, though in other chances he seemed not to know whatever he was doing at all. But one thing I completely admire about him is that he never fears to be misunderstood, and in “Love and Theft” he knew exactly what he’s making — is what I feel.
Mar 9, 2021
His lyrics are like a kaleidoscope or (why not?) a not always clearly tempered salad of the many forms of madness and image beauty that surrounded and still (maybe mentally now) surrounds him since he decided to “get away and never cone back” (the best decision one can make). I found “Love and Theft” specially hard to grasp. It can be, sure wrongly, resumed to “nobody understands what there is to understand and there’s nothing to understand and I don’t care”. I think every Bob Dylan album, after two or three, is like that, but this one is (forgetting his weaker works), among his best, a perfect example of this philosophy. Is a perfect continuation to “Highlands”. Those highlands are a rabbit hole. It’s funny that he called his music “not folk rock: image music”, when the poetry of Ezra Pound (who appeared in “Desolation Row”) was Imagism, and to read Ezra teaching how to steal properly.
Mar 9, 2021
Basically, Dylan is rubbing a lot of nonsense on your face, quotation marks in and out of the songs, 9/11, he’s not that old yet and he was alive! After “Time Out of Mine” (read the title like that: time I won’t live), he couldn’t get more sardonic than he is in this “Love and Theft”, loving to steal for you and yourself and you still say “thank u ;)”. Or else he’s alluding all the time to things only he knows what. Look: he’s not a robber, or a false prophet — “any day above ground is a good day” —, he is Lewis Caroll, and Alicia Keys his Alice. I cannot tell too clear, sorry, but who can?, he lives in another world (as I remember, glorious Empire Burlesque). The album is one of his most beautiful in my opinion. “Po’ Boy” brings me that truly heartfelt sensation of having good times in a boat in a storm, but he’s like joking during the whole record, and he doesn’t even expect you’ll remember or notice that. I don’t get many of his “allusions”, he must’ve heard all the blues ever made.

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Rating Distribution

90-99
 
69

80-89
 
154

70-79
 
136

60-69
 
85

50-59
 
25

40-49
 
15

30-39
 
8

20-29
 
2

10-19
 
1

0-9
 

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Work in progress list. The main idea is to go over the whole Dylan's catalog with all the brights and darks.
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